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Catholic Social Service Refugee Resettlement

ABOUT REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT cath_social_svc_refugee_6.jpg

RECEPTION AND PLACEMENT
The Reception and Placement Services program (R&P) provides for refugees during their first 31 days in the United States. The purpose of the Reception and Placement (R&P) Program is "to ensure that refugees approved for admission are sponsored and offered appropriate assistance in their initial resettlement in the United States." In this regard, funding to cover administrative expenses and the provision of required services is provided by the Department of State. This funding, however, is intended to "augment private resources available to the recipient" (USCCB/MRS).


The goals of the R&P Program include, but are not limited to: "assisting refugees in achieving economic self-sufficiency though employment as soon as possible in coordination with publicly- supported refugee service providers and assistance programs, and, to the extent practicable in the context of local public assistance regulations and practices, precluding any necessity for reliance by refugees on cash assistance authorized under section 412 (e) of the Immigration and Nationalities Act (INA) during the first thirty days that they (the refugees) are in the United States."

For more information contact:
Ferdinand Lossou at (520) 623-0344 ext. 1012 f This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

FAMILY REUNIFICATION
MRS assists persons who are in the United States legally and permanently, who have relatives who are refugees overseas, and who want their relatives to join them in the United States. The person in the United States must file an application called the Affidavit of Relationship (AOR) which serves as evidence of the relationship between a refugee applicant overseas and an anchor relative in the U.S.. MRS helps people complete and file the AOR.

THE PROCESSING PRIORITY SYSTEM
The worldwide processing priority system is a management tool to ensure that those refugees who are of greatest concern to the U.S. have access to the U.S. refugee admissions program. Priorities establish a processing queue for U.S. resettlement consideration, but do not guarantee that an individual will be eligible for admission to the U.S. as a refugee. AORs do not establish eligibility for refugee interview under Priority One and Priority Two. However an "interest" filed with your local diocese will help ensure resettlement with you if your friend/family is approved.

Priority One
Refugees referred for resettlement by the UNHCR or a U.S. Embassy.

Priority Two
Designated groups of special humanitarian concern to the United States.

Priority Three
Spouses, unmarried sons and daughters under the age of 21, and parents of persons lawfully admitted to the US as refugees, asylees, certain parolees, and former refugees or asylees who have adjusted status to permanent resident. Any anchor who entered the U.S. as a refugee or asylee and is filing for a spouse or unmarried child under the age of 21 should also file a follow to join (Visa 92/93) petition (I-730) with the INS.

To File an Affidavit of Relationship Contact:
Ferdinand Lossou at (520) 623-0344 ext. 1012 f This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

More information available at: usccb.org/mrs/aor.htm

EMPLOYMENT
Job Development
The MRS Job Development program helps refugees with all aspects of employment: job search, interview preparation, continued monitoring and assistance after employment, etc.

For more information contact:
Ferdinand Lossou at (520) 623-0344 ext. 1012 f This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

ADJUSTMENT
Match Grant Employment Program
The Match Grant Employment Program helps newly arrived refugees and asylees to become self-sufficient and productive members of their new communities. Designed as an Alternative-to-Welfare program, participants are equipped with temporary financial support, English language training, volunteer mentoring, in-kind incentives, and job training/placement services in order to attain independence-- financial and otherwise --in their new surroundings. This program is funded by private contributions, which are then matched by a grant from the federal office of Refugee Resettlement with $2 for every $1 donated.

Program services are available to almost any newly-arrived, properly-documented refugee or refugee family with at least one employable member, regardless of nationality, who is resettled by USCCB/MRS under the DOS Cooperative Agreement in a diocese participating in Match Grant. Newly-arrived, properly-documented entrants or entrant families resettled through a contract with the Department of Justice (DOJ) or Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) are also eligible for Match Grant services.

For more information contact:
Ferdinand Lossou at (520) 623-0344 ext. 1012 This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

ARIZONA REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT PROGRAM
This program provides continued adjustment assistance to refugees after their initial thirty-one days in Tucson. Many refugees arrive in Tucson without relatives, friends, or other meaningful social connections. For several months they remain in a state of dependency on the resettlement agency, as they become familiar with customs, standards, and requirements of life in the United States. The ARP program is oriented towards assisting refugees in gaining familiarity with their new environment in general, increasing their level of personal confidence, reducing their anxiety, and increasing their self-sufficiency. Also provided is referral to social services, and enrollment assistance for eligible refugees so that they may gain access to social services that assist low-income families.

Eligible refugee families often are not aware of, or do not know how to, gain access to Federal support programs available to low income working families. Programs such as KidsCare, Food Stamps, Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program, health care through AHCCCS, Head Start, low income housing, the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children, child care assistance, and adult day care for aged dependents are important for the well-being of working refugees. These programs assist refugees in maintaining employment and moving toward self-sufficiency. The lack of refugee awareness about these programs stems from the language barrier and not being able to access information through the English-speaking media. Our program provides information about social services in other languages and helps refugees gain access to programs for which they qualify.

Assistance is not only provided to recent arrivals but also to refugees who have been in the United States a longer period of time.

TRAFFICKING VICTIMS
What is Trafficking?
Trafficking in persons is a modern day form of slavery, and it is the largest manifestation of slavery today. At least 700,000 persons annually, primarily women and children are trafficked within or across international borders. Approximately 50,000 women and children are trafficked into the United States each year, according to the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000, Section 102.

Human trafficking is a crime under U.S. federal law. According to the Trafficking Victims Protection Act, "severe forms of trafficking in persons" is defined as:

• Sex trafficking in which a commercial sex act is induced by force, fraud, or coercion or in which the person induced to perform such an act is under 18.

• The recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, or obtaining of a person for labor or services, through the use of force, fraud, or coercion, for the purpose of subjecting that person to involuntary servitude, peonage, debt bondage, or slavery.

Who is Trafficked?
Men, women, and children are all trafficked, although the majority of victims are women and girls. Trafficked persons are generally from countries all around the world but can also be U.S. citizens. They are forced to work in the sex industry or in labor situations such as domestic servitude, manufacturing, construction or migrant agricultural work.

What Rights do Victims of Trafficking Have?
No one can force a person to work against his or her will. Victims of trafficking are entitled to protection and assistance, which may include federal and state benefits, information about their rights and the availability of free or low-cost legal services, and access to translation and interpretation services.

What Are The Needs of Trafficking Victims?
• Safety and Physical Care: Is the individual and his or her family safe from the traffickers? Does the individual have safe, long-term housing, food, and clothing?
• Medical Care: Does the individual have emergency or chronic medical conditions?

  • Mental Health Care: Does the individual exhibit symptoms of stress or trauma?
• Immigration: Does the individual have legal immigration status? Is the individual authorized to work in the U.S.?
• Legal rights: Does the individual have knowledge of her rights and access to the criminal justice system or repatriation and reintegration assistance if she wishes to return home?
• Employment: Does the individual have an employment authorization document? Does the individual have access to job training and placement resources?
• Education: Does the individual have basic educational or independent living skills? Does the individual have access to school or assistance with acculturation?
• Language: Does the non-English speaking individual have access to translation services and English-language instruction?
  • Social Networks: Are there community networks from the individual's culture?
• Spiritual Needs: Is there an appropriate place of worship for the individual who wishes to attend?

Where Can I Learn More?
Department of Health & Human Services/Office
of Refugee Resettlement Certification Process:
www.acf.dhhs.gov/programs/orr/programs/index.htm

Department of State Resources
   

  • Trafficking in Persons Report:
www.state.gov/g/tip

HOW TO GET HELP
If you are aware of or suspect that someone is a victim of human trafficking, please contact:
The Trafficking in Persons and Worker Exploitation Task Force
coordinates victim protection services and works toward prosecuting traffickers. Call toll-free (888) 428-7581 to report a human trafficking situation or to obtain information about appropriate services and assistance for trafficked persons.

Department of Health and Human Services/ Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) provides certification determination and certification to victims of severe forms of trafficking that enable them to receive certain benefits and services. Contact ORR at (202) 401-9246
Department of Health and Human Services/ Office of Refugee Resettlement

http://www2.acf.hhs.gov/programs/orr/programs/astvict.htm

Local Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Immigration and Naturalization Services (INS) or U.S. Attorneys Office.

How Does MRS Help?
MRS can help refer potential trafficking victims to the proper legal authorities and, once that person's status as a victim of trafficking has been certified by those authorities, provide many of the social support and adjustment services that it provides to refugees.

MRS provides information about the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 in order to educate the Tucson and Southern Arizona Community about human trafficking and the rights of trafficking victims. Frequently, due to a language barrier, trafficking victims are not aware of their rights and are kept isolated by their traffickers. If you would like more information or would like to educate others about trafficking use the resources listed above and/or contact the MRS office.

For more information contact:
Ferdinand Lossou at (520) 623-0344 ext. 1012   f This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it